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Posted inImmigration

Alexandra Lozano, immigration lawyer helps Latinos in LA and beyond

At age 16, Lozano had an experience in Guatemala during a school field trip that drove her to become an immigration lawyer. Today, she is the Chief Executive Officer of her law firm, Alexandra Lozano Immigration Law PLLC, with offices in five states, including California, Washington and Texas. Recently, Lozano and her team of lawyers at the Alexandra Lozano Immigration Law PLLC offered free Spanish consultations on immigration issues for residents in southeast Los Angeles.

Posted inHealth

Dr. Mirella Díaz-Santos helps Latinos fight Alzheimer’s disease

Dr. Díaz-Santos is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is also a neuropsychologist with expertise in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, working primarily with the Latino older adult English-Spanish bilingual community and their families. She is also the director of research at the Hispanic Neuropsychiatric Center of Excellence and Human Behavior. In addition, she is an active member of the Women’s Alzheimer’s Association, which funds research into disparities in Alzheimer’s disease. They also focus on education, prevention and advocacy.

Posted inJustice

Anti-Hate Project: LA County Hate Crime Report shows violence is on the rise

The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations released its annual LA County Hate Crime Report last month on December 7. As the new year begins, the high level of hate crimes portrayed in the report brings heavy concern about the state of the city. The report shows the number of hate crimes in LA County has reached the highest number in the last 19 years. Reported hate crimes in LA County grew 23% from 641 in 2020 to 786 in 2021. This is the largest number recorded since 2002. The Latino community was also a prime target in 2021. They were the second-largest group of victims.

Posted inJustice

EYVIN HERNANDEZ, LA lawyer wrongfully detained in Venezuela

For the Hernandez family, there was one loved one missing at this year’s holiday table. Eyvin Hernandez, 44, a beloved son, father and brother, was wrongfully detained in Venezuela in March 2022. His return home is obstructed by the current legal situation he faces in the South American  country. Hernandez can face up to 16 years in prison after being charged with criminal association and conspiracy by the Venezuelan government. Today, Hernandez is being held in DGCIM, a maximum security military prison and one of the most notorious prisons in Cataratas, Venezuela.

Posted inNews

Fill out this survey by KPCC/LAist and help hold Mayor Bass accountable

KPCC/LAist promised during the election that they would not stop paying attention to voters’ concerns once the ballots were counted. Now they’re asking Angelenos to fill out a 5-minute survey to let them know what feels most urgent as Bass takes office. The responses will help KPCC/LAist set the agenda for their reporting in the year ahead and help them hold the new mayor and city council accountable to top concerns. They’ll also share the survey results widely, including with everyone who responded and with organizations such as CALÓ NEWS.

Posted inHealth

LESLIE PRISCILLA, Latinx Parenting founder seeks to end chancla culture

Latinx Parenting, both an online and in-person bilingual organization, is not only rooted in social justice and intergenerational healing, but in the rights and well-being of Latinx children, who, make up 26 percent of the nation’s total child population. To best serve Latinx families, Latinx Parenting offers a multitude of workshops and courses, such as Decolonized Nonviolent Parenting, Ending Chancla Culture and Healing the Madre Wound, for families and current and former Latinx children. CALÓ NEWS spent time with Leslie Priscilla, Latinx Parenting’s founder, to discuss her own Latinx childhood experience, the inner workings and offerings of the organization and additional resources.

Posted inNews

EL NAYARIT, former Echo Park eatery, hub for undocumented, queer Latinos

In 1922, Natalia Barraza immigrated to the United States alone. In 1922, Natalia Barraza immigrated to the United States alone. She had grown up in Tecuala, a small town in Nayarit, Mexico. Although she immigrated not being able to write, read, or speak English, Barraza opened up El Nayarit, a Mexican restaurant formerly located in the Echo Park community Los Angeles. With time, the restaurant became a well-established community hub for immigrants, the LGBTQ community, and women.

Posted inBusiness

NEEMS JEANS, a sustainable and Latinx couple-owned customizable jeans brand

Knowing how important jeans are too many people and hoping to make the buying experience a million times better, Daniela Rodriguez, CEO, and Andre Ramirez, co-founder, founded Neems Jeans in March 2020. Neems Jeans is a Los Angeles-based, custom-made jeans brand, with two important values: to create jeans that are sustainable and environmentally friendly and to be inclusive and create pieces that fit people’s unique body types.

Posted inGovernment

LA City Hall scandal aftermath, Latino academics talk about future

Having Bass as the new mayor of LA has sparked a conversation about whether she will hold the council members accountable for their actions and support honest and adequate representation in City Hall and the city’s districts. “It’s too easy of a political campaign,” said Alexandro Hernandez, associate professor of Chicanx Studies at California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH). “I don’t think electing Bass as Mayor of LA is something [City Hall and voters] can use to sweep everything with the audio leak under the rug and act like everything is better now.”

Posted inHealth

VERONIQUE DIAZ, Latina healthcare worker shares pandemic experience

Diaz is a mother of three children; two boys and a girl. She started as a volunteer at Clinica Romero when one of her children was in high school. “Someone from Clinica Romero gave us a workshop one day and I raised my hand and participated,” Diaz said. Around that time, a promotora from Clinica Romero mentioned to Diaz that she would be a good candidate as a community health worker. “I told the promotora I was too shy for that and that I couldn’t do that, but she convinced me and here I am, six years later.