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Posted inJustice

ANTI-HATE SERIES: LA’s Civil + Human Rights and Equity Department

The city government is relying on one particular department and its leader to focus on maintaining and strengthening the city’s diversity, equity and accountability, the Civil + Human Rights and Equity Department. You can call it the LA Civil Rights (department) for short; and its main goals are to reduce bias, hate crimes and injustices. Capri Maddox was named as the Executive Director of LA Civil Rights in June 2020. “If there is a government start-up, it is us,” Maddox told CALÓ NEWS. “We are new, but we are here to serve all of what LA is. We have a very diverse staff. We want to represent the diversity of Los Angeles.”

Posted inJustice

Anti-Hate Project: LA County Hate Crime Report shows violence is on the rise

The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations released its annual LA County Hate Crime Report last month on December 7. As the new year begins, the high level of hate crimes portrayed in the report brings heavy concern about the state of the city. The report shows the number of hate crimes in LA County has reached the highest number in the last 19 years. Reported hate crimes in LA County grew 23% from 641 in 2020 to 786 in 2021. This is the largest number recorded since 2002. The Latino community was also a prime target in 2021. They were the second-largest group of victims.

Posted inRepresentation

Q&A: LUIS LÓPEZ RESÉNDIZ on Nury Martinez and Reaction by Indigenous, Latino Communities

The audio leak comes one month before the city election, where multiple council seats are sought, including the mayor’s position. “We hope this new election will spark a movement holding our local politicians accountable and having them be more transparent and honest in their work,” says Luis López Reséndiz. Following the news of Nury Martinez and city council members, CALÓ NEWS recently spoke with Luis López Reséndiz, CIELO’s director of the center of language and power department, to understand the feelings within the Indigenous and Latino communities after the leak in-depth.

Posted inOpinion

COMMENTARY: Nury Martinez should embrace Oaxacan culture

In this current political scandal, we have five prominent Mexican-Americans in positions of influence nearly unprecedented historically, given the racist legacy of a past LA dominated by Anglo Americans. If those present did not directly insult the Oaxacans, they at the very least entertained language disparaging them. Such Oaxacan peoples are among the most culturally resilient in world history – and yet intrinsically linked to the national identities of modern Mexican people and their American counterparts. This is the historic legacy bestowed upon those officials, too.

Posted inJustice

Commission on the State of Hate seeks to reduce hate crimes in CA

One of the biggest problems when it comes to hate crimes is the reporting of such crimes and the inaccurate data of hate-driven incidents in the state of California. The attorney general’s office stated that the California Department of Justice recognizes the data presented in its reports may not adequately reflect the actual number of hate crime events that have occurred. There are two appointees on the commission from LA: Bamby Salcedo, 53, and Dr. Erroll G. Southers, 65. Salcedo is the president and chief executive officer of the TransLatin@ Coalition, which advocates for transgender and gender nonconforming and Intersex (TGI) immigrant women in LA. In 2021, Bamby visited the White House to speak on the issues of safety, inclusion and opportunities for transgender individuals. She was the HIV and Health Education Services project coordinator from 2007 to 2015 and the Transgender Harm Reduction project coordinator from 2007 to 2009, both at Children’s Hospital, LA.

Posted inJustice

Biden to host unity summit against hate-fueled violence, while LA hate crimes soar

The United We Stand Summit, which is scheduled for September 15, aims to counter the “corrosive effects of hate-fueled violence on our democracy and public safety,” as well as to highlight and address the Biden-Harris Administration’s response to these dangers, and “put forward a shared vision for a more united America,” as stated by the White House.