Calo News

Sign Up for the Newsletter

Join the most important Latinx owned and operated outlet in Los Angeles.

Posted inUncategorized

Latino teens deputized as Health Educators to sway the unvaccinated

Community health groups in California and across the country are training teens, many of them Hispanic or Latino, and deputizing them to serve as health educators at school, on social media, and in communities where covid vaccine fears persist. According to a 2021 survey commissioned by Voto Latino and conducted by Change Research, 51% of unvaccinated Latinos said they didn’t trust the safety of the vaccines. The number jumped to 67% for those whose primary language at home is Spanish. The most common reasons for declining the shot included not trusting that the vaccine will be effective and not trusting the vaccine manufacturers. And vaccine hesitancy is not prevalent only among the unvaccinated. Although nearly 88% of Hispanics and Latinos have received at least one dose of a COVID vaccine, few report staying up to date on their shots, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Posted inUncategorized

LINDA LOERA brings awareness to how Alzheimer’s impacts Latinos

Alzheimer’s Disease remains an Alzheimer’s Disease remains front-and-center for many Latinos and family members. There is a high chance that most of us are aware of someone whose life has been affected by Alzheimer’s disease, whether it is family or a friend. Approximately 13% of Latinos who are 65 or older have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. Loera is a community outreach specialist with the Alzheimer’s Association, in Southern California. In addition to educating the community about Alzheimer’s disease and participating in community events to bring awareness, she provides information and support to families and caregivers.

Posted inJustice

COMMENTARY: As violence soars in Mexico, we need to do more

I recently returned to the U.S. after spending 14 months in Mexico. At first, the excitement of being back after 22 years in America made me overlook the dangers of being there. While I grew concerned about my safety over time, nothing out of the ordinary happened to me for months. But that changed a week before I returned to the States. August 9th was a normal day at my parents’ house in Irapuato. At 7:30 p.m., a loud explosion interrupted one of our usual long evening chats. An armed command attacked and burned to ashes a convenience store located two-and-a-half blocks from us. That night, drug cartel members set fire to 25 convenience stores, cars and trucks in Guanajuato and Jalisco.