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Posted inOpinion

COLUMN: My undocumented father went back to Mexico, took my heart

Ever since I left my hometown in Queretaro, Mexico, building a place that feels like home in the U.S. has been an ongoing task. Today, the idea of home feels even further away because my father, an immigrant who spent almost two decades in the U.S., will be returning to Mexico. He bought a one-way ticket, not knowing that part of my heart will also be boarding the plane with him. Like him, I’m also undocumented, therefore leaving the U.S. legally, or traveling in and out of the country, is not an option for me. I will soon say goodbye to him, not knowing when I will see him again.

Posted inPolitics

CAROLINE MENJIVAR, daughter of Salvadorian parents, now a top candidate in State Senate District 20

Menjivar grew up in San Fernanco Valley, where her mother cleaned private homes and her father worked as a waiter at a Studio City country club. Menjivar recalled attending Encino Charter Elementary School, a public school in the high-priced suburb of Encino, CA. She immediately felt out of place, she said. “I was going to an affluent school where my classmate’s homes were big and they had big screen TVs,” Menjivar said. “That’s when I started [wondering] why my classmates had so many cool things, big houses, expensive things and we didn’t? As a kid, you don’t know what all that means. You just know that the inequity doesn’t feel right.”

Posted inCulture

COMMENTARY: From Bracero to ‘Braincero’

As a “guest” of the American government, my father—Salomón Huerta, Sr.—worked as a farmworker during the early 1960s under the Bracero Program. Officially known as the Mexican Farm Labor Program (1942-1964), this guest worker program recruited 4.6 million Mexican laborers to toil in America’s agricultural fields, along with the railroad and mining sectors.

Posted inCulture

COLUMN: ‘Jane the Virgin’ writer: From undocumented English learner to Hollywood

Having arrived in California at age 7 from Guayaquil, Ecuador, Agustin offers a rare glimpse into the world of an undocumented student in his new memoir, “Illegally Yours,” published by Grand Central Publishing and available at Barnes & Noble, Amazon and other retailers. Known for his work as a writer on the TV show “Jane the Virgin,” Agustin, 41, now serves as the CEO of the Latino Film Institute, which hosts the annual Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival.

Posted inGovernment

COLUMN: Mexican president snubs the U.S. at the Summit of Americas in LA

Latin America has not been at the top of the foreign policy agenda since Biden took office and it should be given priority. Rather than give a cold shoulder to those we disagree with, we should try to negotiate and work with them to strengthen human rights and their economies. The Summit of Americas is an opportunity for the U.S. to improve relations with our neighbors to the south. Hopefully, enough of them will show up to have a meaningful dialogue.