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Posted inEquity

Latino Media Collaborative wins leadership award from CNPA

On February 2nd, the Latino Media Collaborative, which publishes CALÓ NEWS, was presented with a leadership award by the California News Publishers Association for work supporting the mission of the California News Publishers Association (CNPA) to protect and serve the common interests of news media in California through advocacy in Sacramento. “This award is a testament to the power of the collaborative and of the equity in journalism and communications that we can achieve when we work together to advance a greater good,” said Arturo Carmona, President of the Latino Media Collaborative.

Posted inEnvironment

MICHAEL MARTINEZ, LA Compost, improve LA environment for Latinos

LA Compost currently has 43 community compost locations where community members drop off food scraps for processing into compost as well as 10 locations in LA farmer’s markets. The work done by the organization has led to hundreds of thousands of pounds of organics being diverted from landfills each year. Having parents who utilized the earth and refurbished the forgotten, Michael Martinez aimed to share those teachings and ultimately founded LA Compost. 

Posted inEnvironment

Tzunu, Energy Foundation host forum on SB 1137 and pollution

Four environmental justice experts discussed their views on January 19 in “Media Roundtable to discuss pressing California Environmental issues,” holding California oil industry polluters accountable and limiting pollution in communities of color and Senate Bill 1137. They were Senator Lena A. Gonzalez (D-Long Beach), author of the bill that is now law; nterim co-director of California Environmental Justice Alliance, Mabel Tsang; Amee Raval, policy and research director at the Asian Pacific Environmental Network; and Catherine Garoupa, executive director of the Central Valley Air Quality Coalition.

Posted inNews

EL NAYARIT, former Echo Park eatery, hub for undocumented, queer Latinos

In 1922, Natalia Barraza immigrated to the United States alone. In 1922, Natalia Barraza immigrated to the United States alone. She had grown up in Tecuala, a small town in Nayarit, Mexico. Although she immigrated not being able to write, read, or speak English, Barraza opened up El Nayarit, a Mexican restaurant formerly located in the Echo Park community Los Angeles. With time, the restaurant became a well-established community hub for immigrants, the LGBTQ community, and women.

Posted inEquity

THOMAS A. SAENZ, MALDEF president and general counsel on Latino leadership

Currently, the LA City Council consists of 14 council member: three Blacks, two Asian-Americans, four Whites, one Armenian-American, and four Latinos. District 6 is currently vacant after the resignation of Nury Martinez. Thomas A. Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense Education Fund shares how common it is for Latinos to face under-representation when it comes to positions of leadership in LA.

Posted inEquity

INGRID RIVERA-GUZMAN, works for justice for BIPOC communities in LA

Rivera-Guzman migrated to South Central Los Angeles with her mother and siblings to escape the 12-year war that was occurring in El Salvador. Years later, with hard work and dedication, Guzman received a scholarship to attend the College of the Holy Cross located in Massachusetts, where her interest in politics began. Today, Guzman is the president of the board of directors for Latino Coalition of Los Angeles and continues to help communities thrive in LA.

Posted inRepresentation

JORGE NUÑO, political activist on what needs to be done about LA scandal

During the 1980s and 90s, Nuño grew up in a house nestled near Vernon and Main street in South Central Los Angeles with his sister and their two immigrant parents from Jalisco, Mexico. “I grew up adjacent to the [LA] Coliseum,” Nuño said. “When you grew up in the hood, you’re like, ‘Where you live?’ ‘Ah, I live by the Coliseum,’ so that you can give people some context of what part of LA you live in.” Nuño founded The Big House, a small business incubator housed in the 10-bedroom mansion that Nuño purchased in South Central, where nonprofits can have physical offices in their community.

Posted inEquity

JOSE TRINIDAD CASTAÑEDA, first Latino on Buena Park Council

History has been made in Orange County this midterm election as Castañeda is the first Latino, Native American and LGBTQ person to be elected to the Buena Park City Council. Castañeda beat out his other opponents, winning 43.4% of the vote in a three-way race, according to the Orange County Registrar of Voters. He will fill one of the two open seats on the Buena Park City Council board representing District 2.

Posted inBusiness

COMMENTARY: Support legislation to help Latino small businesses

The National Retail Federation reported that three of the top ten cities for organized retail crime are in California: Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sacramento. It’s no wonder, just this past May, California authorities recovered over $700,000 in stolen merchandise during an arrest of a suspect in connection with a smash-and-grab retail theft ring. These crimes are having devastating effects, particularly on small businesses. Latino small-business owners, who are the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in the U.S. are especially impacted.