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On June 24, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed Roe V. Wade, which removed the constitutional right for abortion healthcare. Ever since the decision was previously leaked, experts who work with Latino communities predicted that the ruling would impact Brown and Black people the hardest.

Los Angeles and Southern California has been ablaze with protests and protestations by Latinos/as/x. CALÓ NEWS hit the streets once again to interview those whose voices are often lost in this time of political chaos and upheaval. This time we visited downtown LA.

Responses have been edited for clarity and brevity.


TIFFANY QUINTERO, 17, West Covina, Barista/Student, She/Her, Latina/Mexican/Colombian

Tiffany Quintero/Photo by Vincent Medina

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

I feel very upset, this is a very huge situation especially because it has been  a constitutional right that has been taken away and been in place for 50 years I’m only 17 years old having to worry about this, hearing and  dealing with this even like my mother who was my age and having to fight for these rights. And now, until this day, she is so surprised. It’s really hurtful that I have to fight for this human right which I feel is healthcare. The fact that I have to be so scared that this is even an option for me is really scary. 

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN?  

Sadly, I believed so. Once I saw the division between six Republicans and Democrats in SCOTUS. It was not how I wanted things to happen. Looking at what we have now, it seems that it was going to happen soon. When it happened I was not happy but I was not in shock. I was not surprised how our federal government is handling it. 

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

I’m here protesting. Whatever I can do. I’ve donated to different funds that I’ve seen online, reposted on my social media and also enlightened some of my family members. I have people in my life who don’t really know about it, like my grandparents, who are not in touch with the news. I’m spreading as much information as I can. I’m 17 and I know that I’m not old enough to vote yet, but I feel that my voice still matters.  


ELSALEE ROCHA, 28, LA, Freelancer, She/Her, Native American/Mexican

Elsalee Rocha/Photo by Vince Medina

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

I was very saddened to hear the news and disappointed because it feels like we’re taking a huge step backwards. It’s just disappointing to see how the system is being set up. I’m just hurt and done with it. 

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN?  

I try very hard now consume so much media because of how they portray a lot of the things. This was a shock and a surprise, but I did see it coming.

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

We need to come together and see what is actually happening to humanity and what is happening to people. We need to stop thinking about [political] parties and start coming together as people and fight for what’s right for humanity and for human rights. We need to start focusing on what’s best for people as a whole instead of what’s best for ourselves as individuals, because this is the United States and right now it doesn’t feel that way.   


VALERIA HERNANDEZ, 27, San Fernando Valley, Special Education Assistant, She/Her, Latina/Mexican

Valeria Hernandez/Photo by Vince Medina

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

It’s scary. I put myself in the shoes of the women who are in other states where it’s illegal and I can only imagine how scared they are. It makes me think that this is just the tip of the iceberg of the whole SCOTUS agenda. 

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN?

I kind of did, but I didn’t even want to look at it. [I figured that] if it comes, then we’ll deal with it. It brings me back to when Donald Trump became president. I didn’t think he’d be president, then he became president. Right now, I have anxiety. I worry about the unknown. I don’t want to stress out, but we have to deal with it. I was kinda unsure about it but not surprised. 

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

Protest and not be quiet. Constantly talk about it on social media or even have a conversation with the person next to you. The fact that it’s even happening, it’s scary.


JASMINE TORRES, 27, Sherman Oaks, Makeup Artist, She/Her, Latina/Mexican

Jasmine Torres/Photo by Vince Medina

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

I’m really sad for young women who don’t have any other option. Let’s say, that they are pregnant [and] it wasn’t under their consent and now they have to have the child. That is disappointing and unfair.  

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN? 

I actually did not think so. I could have been blindsided, but I wasn’t surprised that it did [happen] because of what’s going on in the world now. We never know what to expect.

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

I [am] spreading awareness right now and supporting women. We are all familiar with social media, so I think we should make a big impact and spread awareness of what is happening and donate to places like Planned Parenthood. Especially, in states [where abortion healthcare is] becoming illegal. 


NATALIA TORRES, 38, Pasadena, Teacher, She/Her, Latina/Brazilian 

Natalia Torres/Photo by Vince Medina

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

I feel enraged because I come from South America and so many countries there are moving forward and legalizing abortion. The United States of America is moving backwards and I’m enraged. I can’t put it into words. 

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN? 

Yeah, unfortunately  because there’s three judges on the Supreme Court  that were appointed by Trump’s government. I kind of expected it, but when it comes it hits you even though you already expected it. I’m not surprised and I did expect it, but I’m still enraged. 

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

I think a good idea is to strike. I think striking is a very effective way to demand changes and to be out on the streets, talking to people who organize. But I think we need more protesting on the streets, I think it’s a tiny step. I’m down for a strike, so let’s go! 


ANDREW NAVASSO, 20, South Central, Student at California State University, Domingues Hills, He/Him, Central American 

HOW DO YOU FEEL IN THE LIGHT OF THE RECENT REVERSAL OF ROE V. WADE?

I think it’s pretty [expletive] up, especially because the policies are being made by people who were born in times that were very oppressive to women. They’re trying to oppress women today. I think that is [expletive] for women now because we progressed so much from the past, but now we’ve reached the point where we’re starting to go back to how things were in the past. We’re starting to become worse. 

WHILE THERE WAS ONGOING MEDIA COVERAGE, AND AS YOU WERE SEEING THIS UNFOLD, DID YOU BELIEVE THE REVERSAL WOULD HAPPEN?

To be honest, I thought the reversal of Roe v. Wade was something that couldn’t happen because it was something very historical. Now that it happened, it left all of us in shock and now we’re fighting in the streets. 

WHAT NOW? WHAT WILL YOU DO IN REACTION?

As of right now, I’m just here as a man in solidarity for all women. I’m Latino, and I’m in a predominantly Black community. I think an issue like this is something that affects the Black community and Latino community. I think that this is something that I need to show up for because I’m part of that community and I want to be a voice to the voiceless.